Substance Abuse

    Results: 13

  • Buprenorphine Based MAT Programs (32)
    RX-8450.5000-100

    Buprenorphine Based MAT Programs

    RX-8450.5000-100

    Medication assisted treatment (MAT) programs that use buprenorphin to help people with an opioid use disorder abstain from or reduce their use of opioids (usually heroin or painkillers such as oxycondin or morphine). Buprenorphine produces a weaker version of effects (including euphoria and respiratory depression) that are associated with full drugs such as heroin and methadone. The effects increase with each dose until at moderate doses they level off, lowering the risk of misuse, dependency and side effects. Treatment occurs in three phases: a medically monitored start-up phase when the patient is in early stages of withdrawal; a stabilization phase after a patient has discontinued or greatly reduced their misuse of the problem drug, no longer has cravings, and experiences few, if any, side effects; and a maintenance phase when a patient is doing well on a steady dose of buprenorphine. The length of time of the maintenance phase is tailored to each patient and could be indefinite. Once an individual is stabilized, an alternative approach would be to go into a medically supervised withdrawal, which makes the transition from a physically dependent state smoother. People then can engage in further rehabilitation—with or without MAT—to prevent a possible relapse. Ideal candidates for opioid dependency treatment with buprenorphine have an opioid use disorder diagnosis, are willing to follow safety precautions for the treatment, have been cleared of any health conflicts with using the drug and have reviewed other treatment options before agreeing to buprenorphine treatment.
  • Comprehensive Outpatient Substance Use Disorder Treatment (126)
    RX-8450.1150

    Comprehensive Outpatient Substance Use Disorder Treatment

    RX-8450.1150

    Supervised, structured programs that offer a wide range of outpatient services which may be coordinated by a case manager and may include individual and group counseling, 12-step meetings, social and recreational activities, educational and vocational services, life skills training, primary health care, perinatal health care, a program for family members, relapse prevention services, a continuing care program and supportive services (such as child care, transportation and parenting skills development) for individuals who have problems related to excessive use of alcohol and/or use of other drugs and need access to treatment to maintain their individual recovery plans but do not require the intensity of a day treatment program or 24-hour hospital care. Participants attend the program on a regularly scheduled basis at least once a month but usually more frequently depending on their individual needs. Intensive outpatient programs are usually available three or four days per week for three or four hours per day.
  • Dual Diagnosis (49)
    YF-5000.2100

    Dual Diagnosis

    YF-5000.2100

    A condition in which individuals have a diagnosed mental illness which interferes with their functioning in a substantial way in combination with a chemical dependency problem which aggravates their ability to become stabilized or recover.
  • Inpatient Drug Detoxification (9)
    RX-1700.1700-330

    Inpatient Drug Detoxification

    RX-1700.1700-330

    Programs operated by hospitals or other inpatient facilities and staffed by trained medical personnel that provide assistance and support, including medication, to help individuals who are physically dependent on one or a combination of substances during the withdrawal period. Inpatient detoxification is required when the withdrawal process is potentially dangerous or when the individual has acute medical problems.
  • Inpatient Substance Use Disorder Treatment Facilities (7)
    RX-8450.3300

    Inpatient Substance Use Disorder Treatment Facilities

    RX-8450.3300

    Health care facilities that provide structured treatment programs and support services in the context of a 24-hour, supervised environment for individuals who have problems related to excessive use of alcohol and/or use of other drugs. Included are hospitals that are totally devoted to treatment for substance use disorders and programs within general inpatient health care facilities.
  • Medication Assisted Maintenance Treatment for Substance Use Disorders (44)
    RX-8450.5000

    Medication Assisted Maintenance Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    RX-8450.5000

    Programs that provide treatment that includes approved medication (e.g., methadone, buprenophine, naltrexone) to support the efforts of individuals with an opioid disorder to abstain from or reduce their use of opioids (usually heroin or painkillers such as oxycondin or morphine). The extended-release, injectable form of naltrexone (Vivitrol), which permits monthly rather than daily dosing, may also be used. The objective of maintenance is to gradually reduce the amount of the substitute drug that is required in order to reduce and, if possible, eventually eliminate dependency altogether. Medication assisted maintenance treatment (MAT) may be provided in an outpatient treatment program (OTP) or OTP unit such as a pharmacy or physician's office, or for buprernorphine products (Bunavail, Suboxone, Subutex, Zubslov), a physician's office or other health care setting. Methadone maintenance treatment is provided in a clinic. It is recommended that medication assisted maintenance treatment be provided in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies.
  • Methadone Clinics (13)
    RX-8450.5000-510

    Methadone Clinics

    RX-8450.5000-510

    Medication assisted treatment (MAT) programs that use methadone to help people with an opioid use disorder abstain from or reduce their use of opioids. Methadone works by changing how the brain and nervous system respond to pain. It lessens the painful symptoms of opiate withdrawal and blocks the euphoric effects of opiate drugs such as heroin, morphine, and codeine, as well as semi-synthetic opioids like oxycodone and hydrocodone. Methadone is offered in pill, liquid, and wafer forms and is taken once a day. Pain relief from a dose of methadone lasts about four to eight hours. Patients taking methadone to treat opioid addiction must receive the medication under the supervision of a physician. After a period of stability (based on progress and proven, consistent compliance with the medication dosage), patients may be allowed to take methadone at home between program visits. The length of time in methadone treatment varies from person to person but should be at least 12 months; and treatment must be stopped gradually to prevent withdrawal. The decision to stop treatment needs to be supervised by a physician.
  • Naltrexone Based MAT Programs (48)
    RX-8450.5000-600

    Naltrexone Based MAT Programs

    RX-8450.5000-600

    Medication assisted treatment (MAT) programs that use Naltrexone (Vivitrol) to help people with an opioid use disorder abstain from or reduce their use of opioids. The medication comes in a pill form or as an injectable. The pill form of naltrexone (ReVia, Depade) can be taken at 50 mg once per day. The injectable extended-release form of the drug (Vivitrol) is administered at 380 mg intramuscular once a month. Naltrexone can be prescribed by any health care provider who is licensed to prescribe medications. To reduce the risk of precipitated withdrawal, patients are warned to abstain from illegal opioids and opioid medication for a minimum of 7-10 days before starting naltrexone. If switching from methadone to naltrexone, the patient has to be completely withdrawn from the opioids. Naltrexone blocks the euphoric and sedative effects of drugs such as heroin, morphine, and codeine. It works differently in the body than buprenophine and methadone, which activate opioid receptors in the body that suppress cravings. Naltrexone binds and blocks opioid receptors, and is reported to reduce opioid cravings. There is no abuse and diversion potential with naltrexone. Naltrexone can also be used to treat alcohol use disorders.
  • Opioid Detoxification (10)
    RX-1700.1700-500

    Opioid Detoxification

    RX-1700.1700-500

    Programs that specialize in providing detoxification services for people who have a physical dependency on an opioid substance (usually heroin, oxycodone or morphine). Detoxification methods vary but often entail stabilization via prescription medication such as methadone, buprenorphine (Subutex), buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) or naltrexone administered by medical professionals. Specialized opioid detoxification programs can be either inpatient or outpatient.
  • Outpatient Drug Detoxification (13)
    RX-1700.1700-650

    Outpatient Drug Detoxification

    RX-1700.1700-650

    Programs operated under the supervision of trained physicians, nurses or counselors on an outpatient basis in a medical clinic or other similar setting that provide assistance and support including medical treatment and possibly prescription medication to help individuals who exhibit pharmacological and other indicators of a drug use disorder involving substances other than opiates (e.g., cocaine, amphetamines, benzodiazepines) during the withdrawal period.
  • Relapse Prevention Programs (139)
    RX-8470.6900

    Relapse Prevention Programs

    RX-8470.6900

    Programs that provide structured therapy groups or other interventions which help recovering drug and/or excessive alcohol users make the cognitive, behavioral and attitudinal changes that are necessary to prevent them from returning to their previous patterns of use. The program helps participants deal in a very focused way with a wide variety of issues that have an impact on their commitment to sobriety and may include topics like exercise, nutrition, boredom, addictive behavior, looking forward, work and recovery, guilt and shame, the role of 12-step programs, staying busy, truthfulness, trust, repairing relationships, anger management, money management and dealing with feelings.
  • Residential Substance Use Disorder Treatment Facilities (12)
    RX-8450.7000

    Residential Substance Use Disorder Treatment Facilities

    RX-8450.7000

    Community based residential facilities that provide treatment services in the context of a 24-hour, supervised drug and alcohol-free environment for people who have problems related to excessive use of alcohol and/or use of other drugs
  • Substance Use Disorder Counseling (138)
    RX-8450.8000

    Substance Use Disorder Counseling

    RX-8450.8000

    Programs that provide individual, group or family therapy for individuals who have problems related to the excessive use of alcohol and/or use of other drugs (and/or for their families) to help them better understand the nature of the disorder and support recovery efforts.